Joel

Joel Harvey

Associate

Joel has experience both in relation to criminological and forensic research, and clinical psychology practice in forensic settings. Joel has an MSc in forensic psychology (University of Kent), a PhD in criminology (University of Cambridge) and a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (University of Manchester). He is currently a lecturer in clinical psychology and is programme lead for the MSc in clinical forensic psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London. He continues to work clinically in the criminal justice system. His research interests are in rural life and youth justice, the psychosocial experience of imprisonment, and mental health interventions for people who have offended.

   

His recent experience is as follows:

  • His PhD focused on the psychosocial experience of young adults in prison and included a study on self-harming behaviour (Harvey 2007, Young men in prison: surviving and adapting to life inside, Willan).
  • He is a registered clinical and forensic psychologist and has worked for eight years in forensic settings, with both adults and young people. As part of his clinical psychology training he completed a study with prison officers on perceived physical health, psychological distress and social support (Harvey 2014, The Prison Journal).
  • He has been a research associate on a project funded by the Ministry of Justice’s Safer Custody Group (the Safer Locals Programme Evaluation) and a KPMG Foundation Study on the evaluation of a staff training programme for staff working with young people in STCs and YOIs. He has spent several years researching prisons. He has also worked as a research officer for HM Prison Service on the development team of OASys and also as a research officer with the New South Wales Police Service, Australia.
  • He has co-edited the books Psychological therapy in prisons and other secure settings (Harvey and Smedley 2010, Willan), and Young people in forensic mental health settings: psychological thinking and practice (Rogers, Harvey and Law, 2015).

© 2021 Cordis Bright

Terms & Conditions Cookies policy